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2000 impreza regal blue
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8 Posts
Those pipes and welds tho

So clean on this side exhaust and dump..
Good afternoon fellow RS25 initiates. After a bit of browsing I could not locate a comprehensive guide to fabrication and welding and I think it could be a valuable resource to the community if we had access to one. I have been looking to start this thread for a while to serve as a melting pot of information for those that are trying to dive deeper into the DIY side of things. Have you ever wondered what it takes to build your own turbo kit from scratch? Or maybe how all the guys on Weldporn lay down rainbow colored dimes? Well you have certainly come to the right place!


I find welding and fabrication to be one of the more intimidating aspects of building a car and I am a fabricator by trade. Most people would rather farm the work out to a professional or their cousin's buddie's uncle that lives on the corner. The goal of this thread is to provide those that may want to tackle a welding and fabrication oriented job with either information pertinent to there chosen task or at least a nudge in the right direction from someone that has already done it. Let us move on to why you actually clicked on this thread, shall we?

We'll start with the veggies ( ya, ya, ya, I know rules suck)

- Absolutely NO SOLICITATIONS! This isn't Times Square, no one wants your shitty mixtape. If you have questions regarding where or who can do work for you, contact them outside of the site


- No Bashing of work regardless of quality. You were not born a fabricator we all had to start somewhere. We are trying to encourage quality work, not discourage those who need more practice.


Easy right? Now what we are looking for:

-Any and all questions about Fabricating/welding

-Preferred tools and equipment

-New techniques or ideas

-Metallurgy

-And the most important, Pictures of your work.


Now if you have read this far you can listen to my last spiel. I am by no means a good among fabricators but will answer any questions within my realm of knowledge or refer you to someone or something that might know better. I am encouraging other DIY'ers and other fabricators to chime in as well, there are too many of you to name so pop in and say hello or answer a few questions. One last thing before moving onto the pretty pictures. I intend to do a featured write up once a month on a specific topic preferably one the majority would like to learn about. This could range from how to armor a clutch fork to which welding rod should I use for cast Iron. I would like to incorporate members work in this so start posting your work!

Here's a few of things I have had the pleasure of doing:

A snippet of the welds on my intercooler



My cold side pre-welding




And a few of the hotside






That is all for now. I will post more when they become pertinent or for a featured post. The first of the month is 3 days away, what would you guys like to see in the first featured post?
 

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Turbo, LS swapped Impreza RS
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5,166 Posts
Discussion Starter #62
^Thank sir, there are a few more pictures in my journal if you are looking for some bathroom reading.

Updated the featured article. Thanks to Terry and his wicked tube truck for providing the content for this months feature!
 

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2001 RS 2.5 sedan- SOLD
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43 Posts
Looking for some opinions from you guys. I've been wanting a welder for years now and as always i'm having trouble pulling the trigger on one.

From everything i've read, mig welders are easy but if you really want to learn, a tig machine is what you want. A tig welder will also be able to work with thicker and different kinds of material.

Do you think i'm better off finding something on craigslist, buying a HF vulcan machine or maybe Eastwood?
been going through the same dilemma, would you guys recommend buying used?
 

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#32
95 Coupe, 95 Sedan & 95 Wagon
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12,104 Posts
Honestly anything guys if you are trying to learn and get good. It's like driving a car, you don't need a specific car to learn best in. But you have FWD, RWD, and AWD which drive differently. Flux, Mig, Tig...

I am being very broad with this statement on purpose. We don't need to debate the options haha.

The point it, choose what you want to learn with and go with that. Probably mig would be good as it's range of welding is a lot more than flux, and you can focus more welding and less on hand and foot.

Like auto vs manual. Easier to learn to drive with, but manual is more fun!

I hope you guys are dying inside from this ;)
 

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2001 RS 2.5 sedan- SOLD
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43 Posts
^^^ grinding teeth bue car LOL

well I guess I'm either gonna go with a new eastwood setup or wait around for a Hobart handler 140 on craigslist. see a few local to my area for $500 with full tank
 

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Turbo, LS swapped Impreza RS
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5,166 Posts
Discussion Starter #71
What model do you have ted?
TIG 200 non-digital
MIG 135

I get 330CF (I think, its probably 5ish feet tall) for 75-85$ depending on the time of year for straight argon. My mix bottle is smaller and only like 20-30$ depending on the month.
 

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Turbo, LS swapped Impreza RS
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Discussion Starter #73
January 2019: Introduction to Fusion 360 and aluminum fabrication

Disclaimer: I hold no responsibility to your personal safety. Fabrication and welding often requires heat, flames, and other things that can harm you if not properly equipped or prepared. Keep a fire extinguisher handy at all times because if you haven’t set something on fire it is only a matter of time. Fabricate at your own risk

This project took a bit longer to design as I'm still learning as a I go but better late than never right?

This month's project features a bit CAD as well as some aluminum fabrication. As some of may of seen a few of us on here are utilizing Fusion 360, an offshoot of Autodesk Inventor, to make some of our projects. The program is relatively user friendly, has a huge online database for help, and the best feature in my book, is the ability to get it for free as a "student". It's as simple as adding ".edu " in your login information, and fibbing on a few of the questions and bingo bango you have yourself 3D capable design software.

While more advanced users might go straight to the sketch feature on the program I still like to have a drawing on paper to reference for base dimensions. Pictured also are the preliminary sketches in finalized "drawing" form. I removed the dimensions as I was only printing the drawings to trace and not layout again.





After creating the two separate sketches in 2D I combined them in the program to ensure the 2 pieces would line up once they were cut. Once you have both sketches on the same workspace its relatively easy to extrude them to your desired thickness in my case .125".





The program makes it very easy to lay the drawings out so they are easy to trace. Be careful when doing it though, my program defaults to half-scale so I printed my design twice.



I tape my papers to the work piece to make it easy to center punch multiple holes. A nifty little feature in the program lets you mark centerlines of any holes and even any arcs or curves with a linear radius.

I hate cutting out aluminum but thankfully these were small enough to cut on the shear. I drilled all the holes prior to cutting the pieces so I didn't have to cut the arcs.



Look and behold as the magic of computer laid holes allow the pieces to line up precisely.





I purposely left out what I was making in the beginning in hopes of making you read through and not looking at just the pictures so for the readers I thank you and for the viewers I hope you learned as much as you could. It is a simple bracket for holding my blow off valve pressure lines to the charge pipe in hopes of keeping it off the accessory belt.

This is how they look currently



And the intended goal for the bracket





Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
 

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Turbo, LS swapped Impreza RS
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Discussion Starter #75
My lazy ass would make the 1 piece and slip the hose through. No need for a fancy 2 piece, unbolt the top haha.

Still a fancy cool neat project! Going above and beyond :D
Thanks haha. It wouldn't work as a single piece, the fittings are all push lock so they are a pita to undo, so I figured it would be better as two pieces. It's also good practice to join two seperate drawings in Fusion.

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
 

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Turbo, LS swapped Impreza RS
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Discussion Starter #77
Did a small side project for my RS. The fuse panel sits right where the passenger airbag was so I figured a cover would be appropriate and keep the largest portion of wiring hidden and tidy.

I started with a model in fusion. The sheet metal workspace makes sheet metal bending and cutting a breeze. Since I unfortunately do not have a industrial sized printer and it was Sunday that I started (Staples was closed, I am impatient) , I was limited to 8.5×11 so I needed all the corresponding dimensions.



With a the dimensions laid out I transferred it to 1:1 on to another sheet. It takes a lot more attention to detail to lay it out on paper with dimensions as it only takes a few times of drawing your line on the wrong side of the ruler to have the whole thing skewed my a 1/16th or more. I have done it a few times now to know to keep a mechanical pencil handy and to use the same ruler throughout the entire layout. You may still be off by a hair or too but the semantics can be altered once the piece is in sheet metal.



The hard part is done now it was as easy as tracing it out onto aluminum and cutting it out. Now since I wanted the piece to be 3D without having to weld 5 separate pieces I added bends into the drawing. There are a few different ways to bend sheet metal and since the likelihood of you guys having access to a finger brake is slim I chose to do it with a homeade press brake. Since my bends were a round number at 90 degrees I could better get away with this. If the bend required is say, 37 degrees, you will be less than fortunate. A press brake is simple, you have a die, a sheet of metal and then your radius die. The bottom die pictured below is a piece of angle iron welded to another piece of angle iron to allow it to stand by itself.



The idea is to press your sheet into the lower die using a die who's radius is the same as the bend you desire. I modeled the drawing with a .125" radius so I could utilize a simple piece of quarter inch flat stock as my upper radius die. I rounded the ended slightly on the upper die to prevent any unwanted gouging in the bend. The sheet is placed atop the die with your bend line centered in relation to both dies. Slowly press your sheet into the lower die using the aforementioned press , adjusting the sheet to center if need be. If you play your cards right it forms a uniform radius bend without having to relief cut or any of that nonsense.





When I finished the cover I quickly realized it looked pretty bland. Maybe some labels, nah. A few stickers, negative too gawdy. A personalized logo, now we are talking. Some of you may have seen my "Factory Fabrication" stickers floating around in my journal as that is what I masquerade as for any sidework I take on. A few doodles later I whipped up this:



Twin stylized F's for you guessed it, Factory fabrication. As much as I like hand drawings it was easier to pop the drawing into Fusion to make sure it was perfectly symmetrical and give me nice drill and cut lines.



I don't have a plasma table to I cut out the logo with a hand shear and then filed all the remaining material.



Which I then welded onto the cover, drilled the holes and mounted it so together. I don't like how the center weld looks so I think I am going to leave the center slot open next time.



Questions, comments, critiques are always welcome. I hadn't touched a TIG in nearly a month before this project so I wasn't entirely displeased with my welds but there's always improvement to be made.

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
 
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