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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to change the plugs in my 2000rs and I heard that the NGK vpower plugs were highly recommended. My ? is that I found two different serial numbers but only one Part no. Which one is the right one? The part no is 2756. The serial numbers are BKR6E-11 and BJR6E-11. Could someone clarify? Thanks.
 

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'93 L wagon, '04 FXTi
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I'm just guessing, but I think that one is platinum and the other is Iridium. Either that or they are different gaps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info. What about Iridium plugs? Are they better than the copper NGK plugs? How long would a set of NGK's last? anyone know off hand?
 

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2004 Forester XTi
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I don't know if these answers your question, but it's directly off the NGK site. Could an iridium plug = a colder plug?

Q: Why are there different heat ranges?

A: It is a common misconception that spark plugs create heat. They don't. A heat range refers to how much heat a spark plug is capable of removing from the combustion chamber.

Selecting a spark plug with the proper heat range will insure that the tip will maintain a temperature high enough to prevent fouling yet be cool enough to prevent pre-ignition. While there are many things that can cause pre-ignition, selecting a spark plug in the proper heat range will ensure that the spark plug itself is not a hot spot source.

Q: Why are there different heat ranges?

A: It is a common misconception that spark plugs create heat. They don't. A heat range refers to how much heat a spark plug is capable of removing from the combustion chamber.

Selecting a spark plug with the proper heat range will insure that the tip will maintain a temperature high enough to prevent fouling yet be cool enough to prevent pre-ignition. While there are many things that can cause pre-ignition, selecting a spark plug in the proper heat range will ensure that the spark plug itself is not a hot spot source. More information about heat ranges can be found here.
 

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scrubaru said:
Thanks for the info. What about Iridium plugs? Are they better than the copper NGK plugs? How long would a set of NGK's last? anyone know off hand?
Iridium and platinum plugs are better mainly because they last much longer. I don't think they have all that much different spark characteristics.
 

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Scoobymods Guy
2010 Legacy 3.6R Limited
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1,157 Posts
Copper are the type of plugs I like to use in my RS. They are standard copper type. From what I gather copper is the best performance wise. Copper conducts better than plats. They just don't last as long as Platinum plugs. I change my plugs every spring. They only cost 1.50 each and it's not that hard. Platinum for longevity and Copper for performance.

Plug changing guide here:

http://www.scoobymods.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=166
 

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Which coppers do you use peaty? Standard stock plugs or something else? I am open to the idea that they work well, but I have had good results from Bosch platinums in several vehicles, although they were hardly high-stress engines ('95 Ranger 4 cyl, '94 Mercury Topaz 4 cyl, and '80 280ZX) so maybe I shouldn't go back to the well with the Suby.
 

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Scoobymods Guy
2010 Legacy 3.6R Limited
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Click on the how to link I posted and you can see the plugs. The standard coppers that come in the RS are Champions. I changed those out as soon as I found that out. I would not reccomend going to those. I like the NGK's myself those are what I used.
 
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