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2001 Coupe
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1,256 Posts
Discussion Starter #82
Thanks for remembering me dudes... I'll try to get an update going shortly.


Great build!
Awesome job!
Great attitude as well!
Thanks man. If it ever becomes too tedious or i lose too much drive for it, It's going up for sale to the first person with a fist full of cash. If this were my only transportation, it would be hell.

where you been jonny boy!!?
Around. Traveling a lot for work... busy season is upon me. Getting some work done though in between trips. I'm a wreck though. Had a day off last weekend and that was the first since mid June.

^yea no kidding. to much travel i guess.
You said it Bob. Two provinces in Canada, Maryland, New York and Michigan. Now home for a bit and trying to get this thing wrapped up asap.

I have a few questions after reading,
I did end up reusing my head bolts. Status quo said yes. Buddy who is a lifetime Subaru tech said go for it. I was questioning it originally after seeing the scale or stains in the photo earlier in the thread. I did end up putting a set of calipers to them, then to the washers. I was honestly looking for any excuse to not use them and couldn't find one.

The vinegar trick is no where near as effective as a machine shops "hot tank." I have only ever used it for rust. And it works well there. Believe it or not, old timers often charge the water with a battery to speed up the process. In general, think of it as a real mild acid. One could use it to clean grime and funk, but again, it's not nearly as effective as a degreaser. I do it because it's easy and cheap and will reach places I can't spray/wipe/grind.

The intake was smooth operator when I got done with it. No casting marks, no casting texture, just pure sexy metal.
 

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2000 Impreza (Awaiting Swap)
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The vinegar trick is no where near as effective as a machine shops "hot tank." I have only ever used it for rust. And it works well there. Believe it or not, old timers often charge the water with a battery to speed up the process. In general, think of it as a real mild acid. One could use it to clean grime and funk, but again, it's not nearly as effective as a degreaser. I do it because it's easy and cheap and will reach places I can't spray/wipe/grind.

The intake was smooth operator when I got done with it. No casting marks, no casting texture, just pure sexy metal.
Now im assuming this would be effective towards body rust?
Would it clean up this? possibly?



 

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2001 Coupe
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Discussion Starter #92
What DO you do again?
I would love to try and keep work and this site separate, so for shits and giggles let's say I work within the realm of motorsports.

You should post some pics of your engine room! bed and all!
You asked for it.
Here's what it looked like before the motor went on the stand and I was compiling, sorting and cleaning parts. Top of the pic is the bed in the spare bedroom.




Then the girlfriend started organizing and cleaning tools that were filthy and scattered from the flood.




One of the last pieces I found "missing" from the machine shops was a stud so it could go back on the stand. Was a happy day when I could finally get the motor off the floor.




I guess I don't really have a cheesy picture of the bed and the engine after all. I'll have to get that.


Now im assuming this would be effective towards body rust?
Would it clean up this? possibly?
You mean the rust in the suspension components? Sure. I guess if you wanted to remove those parts, soak them for days, then repaint them... it would work. But honestly you would be better off taking care of that underbody stuff while under the car. If you remove that subframe shit, I would highly recommend blasting and painting it, if not replacing it all together.
 

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2001 Coupe
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Discussion Starter #93 (Edited)
Oh, and as far as all the dragstrip talk goes...
Jonny O does not want to go anywhere this weekend.

Although I will road trip to meet you guys once this thing is done, it's not going to be now. I finally have a weekend off from the road. It's sleeping in my own bed, eating anything but fast food, girlfriend time and engine assembly for me.
 

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2001 Coupe
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Discussion Starter #98 (Edited)
UPDATE: A hillbilly solution to a redneck problem.

Engine on stand. Parts cleaned and at hand. Tools close by. Slap the heads on and go, right?




But... the head won't go on. Hmm. Let's take a look. Why won't the dowel pin go in the head.

Interesting time to be scraping shards of aluminum out of the head. As soon as I saw this damage to the head I knew what was up.




The block was decked a tad. That obviously meant pulling the dowel pins out of the block and replacing them once it was resurfaced. Well, I guess it meant they were pulled out and hammered back in in my case.




Those internal easy out marks showed that he didn't flip the pins and install them upside down... which I thought was common practice when you weren't replacing them. That meant the outer diameter of the pins was fucked and wasn't going to go, no matter what I did.

With the limited amount of time I was working with, I needed to devise a plan to fix it. Now. Not wait on new pins to come, fabricate more, or try to remove them and turn them back down.

Then the hillbilly in me came out.

One roll of masking tape, one shop towel, one shop vac, one pair of newish sharp toothed vice grips.

Started by taping up everything but the pin. Hey, Buurma, there's the bed in the spare bedroom.




Lightly adjust vice grips to barely touch the pin, add suction and turn.




Definitely turned down the high spots. Fairly evenly.




Stopped when the calipers said I was close. Finished it off with an emery cloth.

I was very freaked about metal, the exposed rotating assembly and heads, but went slow, kept the vac on hand and cleaned up well. I covered everything that could have ended up with metal on it in another layer of tape before peeling it up.

Wipe it all down once more with the lint free rags and alcohol, then boom.
One down, one to go.

You'll notice the water pump is labeled according to the torque sequence in the FSM. The woman let me talk her through it, then she took over and did a wonderful job. It was cool to show her a 2-step sequence too.




Thought this was worth sharing. It's one of those things I would never purchase, but will borrow the fuck out of.



Socket goes on one side, breaker goes on the other. A little adjustable "leg" holds the scale in place and the dial turns as you rotate the fastener.

Was cool to KNOW that you were getting 85 degrees on every step, not guessing 80-90.
 

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2001 Coupe
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Discussion Starter #99
UPDATE: Dirty bunghole.

Next chance I got, the other head was on.
I did a quick check of the valves and I think they are all a tad tight now. Anyone advise leaving them, or resetting after the head torques on?




At this point, I'm pretty stoked. I have waited so long for this. Don't stop not mother fucker, soon you'll be on the road for another 2 weeks.

I'm putting a lot of faith in the oil cooler. I flushed it for hours until I was comfortable with it. When I got it, I called Preston at Flatirons again and told him to send me all the "soft" parts for the Forester setup.

For documentation purposes, here's what came.




Looks sexy. Looks like it's going to be damn close to the Borla. We'll see how this works out.




I'm a hose clamp snob. Not a big fan of the squeezee clamps. And it's got to be stainless in Ohio. Gave these comp cams clamps a try and love them so far. The "threads" in the band aren't holes, just grooves... so no cutting out. The edges of the band are tapered up, and the worm itself is offset so it doesn't roll. Pretty bad ass for something so simple. Call me a dork. Go ahead. But know they were cheaper than the shitty ones.




Buurma, my resident welder, transplanted his life, along with his lovely girlfriends, an hour away simply because he didn't want to weld for me anymore. I turned the oil pan over to a co-worker, along with the bung for an oil temp probe. I was not happy when I saw the result.

Please insert your own ugly bung hole joke here. I am about out of humor.




I was honestly ALMOST willing to let something so ugly go on the car. He said he had a lot of trouble with the mig burning through and couldn't get the heat to settle down. I figured that if it held oil, I would be able to look past it without puking too much.

Then I filled it with water.

Then I spent an hour doing this.




Ground it down as thin as I could without getting into the really ugly burned-through spots.




I turned to a couple dudes who live in the top fuel realm of life. Two hours later I showed up to see this beautiful work.




Insert beautiful bunghole joke here.

They plated over the previous "weld" and sealed it all up. My girlfriend makes them cookies. They weld shit for me and give me cool broken fuel parts. Should have waited for them in the first place.

With this angle you can see how they tapped the new plate into the contours of the pan.




On a side note, the hero of this process has been the Brighton. She is such a trooper. A million trips out to the machine shop, parts runs, buzzing back and forth to the shop where the car is. I beat her up and she doesn't care. And I love her for it. So to thank her, she will be included here.

And yes, this is the same car from the first post. Totaled once, flooded once and still kicking ass.

 
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