Subaru Impreza GC8 & RS Forum & Community banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I made this youtube video recording every single nut, bolt, hose and plug I removed from my Auto 1999 2.5RS to get the engine out:


I would like to think this is foolproof tutorial but I am happy to clarify anything. One reason I wanted to add my video to the existing pool of diy info, is that I found it tricky to track down any full guide that walked through removing the engine from an automatic car (like mine). This is important because a big mistake people made is not unbolting the torque convertor before taking out the engine. I had to read a bunch of scattered comments on different posts to figure that out. If I had blindly followed a manual trans guide, I would have screwed myself. Many have had massive headaches trying to install back the torque convertor. So my video avoids the headache for anyone with an automatic GC.

I made this video in hopes of helping other first-timers, like me, to pull their engine and take their knowledge to the next level. This is the first engine I have ever pulled and so I knew that there would be other people out there who would want even the simpliest parts of this engine removal shown visually in video form. The video is also to help me remember where things bolt/plug back in.

I spent months trying to do my research before touching a single bolt to make sure I don't mess up and I have to give credit to the following post for most of my success: DIY: Engine Removal
The above thread is a manual car and so not all steps are directly applicable to an automatic car.

Due to my own lack of experiance, you will notice I struggle with a few steps but everything works out in the end.
Hope this helps at least one person and please let me know if any mistakes were made/said.
 

· Registered
2000 RS Coupe
Joined
·
686 Posts
This is welcome and is certainly helpful. I've pulled a multitude of engines out of every manner of Subaru over the past 17 years but I've never had the pleasure of having to pull one out of an automatic before. My daughter has a 1997 L wagon 2.2 auto that I'm going to need to service in the near future, and you're right about the seemingly random info and procedure about properly separating the torque converter, how to do it, and how to properly put it back together. Thank you.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,154 Posts
I didn't think this was....needed. But thank you! The torque converter bolts are actually fairly straight forward to get to. On N/A's with Autos I will remove/install the intake manifold while the long block is in the car. Otherwise being able to put the 25nm of torque on those bolts is a smidge difficult as the NA throttle body is closer to the firewall than turbos models.

I have had a few torque converters not want to let go of the flexplate, when I notice I just stick a prybar in there and put the torque converter back. If it does come out and you are having a hard time getting the torque converter to reseat, fiddle with the input shaft as it has likely let go of its holder and needs to be reseated.

I generally go in this order, taking off as many things as I can with the tool in my hand

Drain oil and coolant (coolant drains easiest and fastest by unbolting the thermostat housing), unplug the O2 sensors and remove exhaust manifold and midpipe (6 14's at the manifold, one 14 at the hanger, and 12/14 combo on the spring bolts, unplug fans, disconnect and plug AT cooler lines at the frame (vacuum cap and spark plugs are perfect for this), remove both ground straps (10mm at the heads, not the frame), remove lower two bolts, two nuts, and motor mounts, usually get the lower starter nut while I'm there. Move to the top:

Unplug bulk head harness and remove from holder, unplug MAF (if applicable)
10mm - battery, both air boxes, power steering hose bracket if applicable and hood prop holder if not built in to a radiator bracket
Unplug and unbolt alternator harness and disconnect A/C plug and tuck in to fender well
12mm - alternator, power steering pump tucks in to the passenger fender well, radiator brackets, remove radiator with fans/overflow/thermostat housing attached. I've found the thermostat housing will tuck in to the fan nicely and stay. disconnect throttle body heater lines and disconnect the knock sensor, intake manifold
14mm - A/C compressor bracket (this can be stuffed in to the now empty battery area), pitchstop, starter + bellhousing bolts (remove the heater core hoses and torque converter bolts before undoing all the bellhousing bolts)

Once the intake manifold is out of the way, heater core hoses and torque converter bolts are ezpz. The heater core hoses can be stuck behind the hard lines along the firewall to get them out of the way and not spill coolant.

Dealers choice on how you want to hoist. I prefer to use the OE brackets, but that does involve removing the 12mm bolts holding the compressor to the bracket, this does make the compressor smaller and easier to tuck in to the battery area though. Since I've done this a jillion times; I've got the perfect chain set up to get a level pull, absolutely necessary or you're going to work too hard. Alternatively you can, with the intake manifold off, just use a couple of the intake manifold bolts and bolt your chain to the heads. doesn't need to be tight tight but do run them all the way down.

I've also found it so much easier if you are able to get a jack stand under the transmission to lift it off the frame. 2-3 inches up is ideal so you don't have to fight the motor mount studs. With how i have my chain set up, i get the lower studs lined up and started in the holes, give the hoist a half to full pump, and then lift the front of the motor and it basically slides home. It's beautiful.

This is not definitive, just from memory of going through the motions. I can have one of these motors out in about an hour...hour and a half depending how lazy i'm feeling. The N/A chain motors are even easier to pull, Subaru streamlined that shit cause they knew... LOL
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This is not definitive, just from memory of going through the motions. I can have one of these motors out in about an hour...hour and a half depending how lazy i'm feeling. The N/A chain motors are even easier to pull, Subaru streamlined that shit cause they knew... LOL
For sure, there's definitely short cuts for me to find over time. Taking the intake manifold off is a good tip. I'll try to remember that when torquing the bolts back on and when this engine comes out again later for a wrx swap.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is welcome and is certainly helpful. I've pulled a multitude of engines out of every manner of Subaru over the past 17 years but I've never had the pleasure of having to pull one out of an automatic before. My daughter has a 1997 L wagon 2.2 auto that I'm going to need to service in the near future, and you're right about the seemingly random info and procedure about properly separating the torque converter, how to do it, and how to properly put it back together. Thank you.
Glad it will be useful. The torque convertor was the main part making me nervous just from reading what others said haha. But as Silverton said above, its a fairly simple thing once you actually do it.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top