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pkZero is now a US distributor of Tarox Brakes. We offer 6 or 10 piston aluminum calipers that fit in your stock wheels. Kits include calipers, rotors, lines, and all mounting hardware. Larger rotors for larger wheels are available as well.

$1750 6 piston
$1975 10 piston

 

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10 piston brakes?! :eek:

WRC cars don't even have brakes that big

I'd like to see a pic of those, if possible.
 

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That's what I was thinkin,' I actually pointed this thread out to ol' JGard a few mins. ago.

I never heard of 10-pots. You're going to have to offer some serious info here, scooby.

-S2-
 

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10-pots made by Tar-Ox. The pistons themselves look really small though. In my Options magazine, they are advertised as.

"Specially designed for cars with mushy brake pedal (you know what they are)" And there's a pic of a steel blue mica Impreza next to this box. hehe.

Tar-Ox has got some radical designs.. that's for sure.

Don
 

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The more pistons your caliper has, the more even it can distribute the clamping force to the rotor. Beyond that, it is nothing more than bragging rights.
 

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it kinda depends. If there are a bunch of real small pistons, then 4-pots, with big pistons could be better...
 

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Bingo. It's about the numbers only to a point. :D

Just like all these retarded car companies that release "high end" car stereo options (usually from Blows.... ehm I mean Bose) with 8-10 speakers in the car.

More speakers don't mean better sound, especially from Bose. ;)
My two-speaker Boston Acoustics components will beat the snot out of all of those lame things.

Same idea. It's all about execution.

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Bingo. It's about the numbers only to a point.
the words your looking for are "surface" and "area" ;)

the amount of brake force is derived from your leg and the master cylinder/slave cylinder, with pads on the side. the rest of the stuff is all about heat management. more pistons mean that the force is distributed over a greater area, so that the heat is not as localized, thus allowing more force (and thus heat) to build up before failure. same idea behind larger rotors. holes and slots are for venting off toasty hot gasses being expelled from the pad material and to allow cool air to flow over the (increased) surface area of the rotor.
 

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wistful said:
"Specially designed for cars with mushy brake pedal (you know what they are)" And there's a pic of a steel blue mica Impreza next to this box. hehe.
yeah, i saw the same ad in evo, and i had to snicker to myself for a bit. 10 piston calipers... :drool: they looked like something off of robocop's suit.

www.tarox.com
 

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10 piston............................I don't know.......now 12 piston and fitting under my 15in wheels then you would have a set sold:devil:
 

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The Audi RS6 uses 8 piston brakes. Super Touring Cars used to run 12 piston calipers from Alcon and twin 4 pot calipers from AP.

Typically, the more pistons you have in the brake system, the more initial bite you have.

Cheers,


Ethan Fisher
 

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the sickest thing i have seen lately was a passat with 19" magnesium wheels with probably like 14-15" rotors with dual 4pot calipers and it was converted to single lug.
 

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There is a good reason for more pistons

It's not just surface area that we're worried about. There's also "effective radius" (the radius at which the friction acts on the rotor), which is proportional to the actual brake torque exerted by the caliper. For the same line pressure and piston surface area, a higher radius gives you more torque, and therefore improved brake feel (lower travels, lower efforts, etc). With all brakes, your effective radius is limited by rotor diameter (which is limited by wheel size). For a rotor of a given OD, you want the effective radius to be as large as possible. A single big piston would give you a max effective radius of the rotor radius minus the piston radius. In order to get the largest effective radius, you want to either increase the rotor OD, or decrease the piston diameter.

But there's more to it than that, like creating even temperature distributions, but that's too much to discuss.
 
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